Sunday, March 15, 2020

Free Essays on Starbucks

Introduction of the company Wake up and smell the coffee Starbucks is everywhere. The US's #1 specialty coffee retailer, Starbucks operates nearly 4,000 coffee shops in a variety of locations (office buildings, shopping centers, airport terminals, supermarkets) in some 20 countries worldwide. Starbucks sells coffee drinks and beans, pastries, and other food items and beverages, as well as mugs, coffeemakers, coffee grinders, and storage containers. The company also sells its beans to restaurants, businesses, airlines, and hotels, and it offers mail-order and online catalogs. Starbucks has expanded into coffee ice cream (with Dreyer's) and makes Frappuccino, a bottled coffee drink (with PepsiCo). Three Seattle entrepreneurs started the Starbucks Corporation in 1971. Their prime product was the selling of whole bean coffee in one Seattle store. By 1982, this business had grown tremendously into five stores selling the coffee beans, a roasting facility, and a wholesale business for local restaurants. Howard Schultz, a marketer, was recruited to be the manager of retail and marketing. He brought new ideas to the owners, but was turned down. Schultz in turn opened his own coffee bar in 1986 based on Italian coffee cafes, selling brewed Starbucks coffee. By 1987, Schultz had expanded to three coffee bars and bought Starbucks from the original owners for $4 million. He changed the name of his coffee bars from Il Giornale to Starbucks. His intention for the company was to grow slowly with a very solid foundation. He wanted to create a top-notch management by wooing top executives from other well-known corporations. For the first two years, Starbucks losses doubled as overhead and op erating expenses increased with Starbucks’ expansion. Schultz stood his ground and did not sacrifice long-term integrity and values for short-term profit. By 1991, Starbucks’ sales increased by 84% and the company was out of debt. Starbucks grew to 26 stor... Free Essays on Starbucks Free Essays on Starbucks Introduction of the company Wake up and smell the coffee Starbucks is everywhere. The US's #1 specialty coffee retailer, Starbucks operates nearly 4,000 coffee shops in a variety of locations (office buildings, shopping centers, airport terminals, supermarkets) in some 20 countries worldwide. Starbucks sells coffee drinks and beans, pastries, and other food items and beverages, as well as mugs, coffeemakers, coffee grinders, and storage containers. The company also sells its beans to restaurants, businesses, airlines, and hotels, and it offers mail-order and online catalogs. Starbucks has expanded into coffee ice cream (with Dreyer's) and makes Frappuccino, a bottled coffee drink (with PepsiCo). Three Seattle entrepreneurs started the Starbucks Corporation in 1971. Their prime product was the selling of whole bean coffee in one Seattle store. By 1982, this business had grown tremendously into five stores selling the coffee beans, a roasting facility, and a wholesale business for local restaurants. Howard Schultz, a marketer, was recruited to be the manager of retail and marketing. He brought new ideas to the owners, but was turned down. Schultz in turn opened his own coffee bar in 1986 based on Italian coffee cafes, selling brewed Starbucks coffee. By 1987, Schultz had expanded to three coffee bars and bought Starbucks from the original owners for $4 million. He changed the name of his coffee bars from Il Giornale to Starbucks. His intention for the company was to grow slowly with a very solid foundation. He wanted to create a top-notch management by wooing top executives from other well-known corporations. For the first two years, Starbucks losses doubled as overhead and op erating expenses increased with Starbucks’ expansion. Schultz stood his ground and did not sacrifice long-term integrity and values for short-term profit. By 1991, Starbucks’ sales increased by 84% and the company was out of debt. Starbucks grew to 26 stor...

Friday, February 28, 2020

Assignment 1 part 3 Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

1 part 3 - Assignment Example Anna loved her sister Kate so much that though she also suffered from pains due to medical procedures, she never opposed her parents’ decision in favour of Kate’s health. However, during court trial it was also the same sisterly love which made her pursue the lawsuit against her parents for medical emancipation. During her testimony in court when Campbell asked her as to who convinced her to file a lawsuit, she replied, â€Å"Kate.† (p.449). She recalled the time when she saw Kate holding pills, purposely to end her life (p.460). Then, at one time, Kate convinced her not to donate her kidney by making her imagine a life where she could join hockey, go to any college she wants without having to worry about her sick sister (p. 462). Following her sister Kate’s advice of not donating her kidney, she thought of filing a case against her parents for medical emancipation. Secondly, parents’ love for their children is a value very much evident in the novel. Sara loved Kate so much that she was willing to do every thing for her daughter’s sake even to the extent of representing herself and her husband in court against her own youngest daughter’s claim for medical emancipation. Brian had been a very loving and supportive father to Anna by making her stay with him in the fire station for a couple of days as court hearing commenced. Before the hearing, Brian sympathized with her daughter Anna and vowed to take side with her, allowing her not to donate her kidney. Yet, during the trial, he burst into tears, expressing his wish for Anna to donate her kidney to save Kate’s life. That’s how strong his love was for Kate. In another incident, we also see Brian as a very loving father to Jesse when he discovered that Jesse committed arson in an elementary school near their house as all the clues were pointing to him. Yet, Brian kept it as a secret out of love for his son. This incident touched Jesse

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

MIH512-Demography and Health (Module 4-SLP) Essay

MIH512-Demography and Health (Module 4-SLP) - Essay Example Morbidity refers to a measure that helps in determining factors that affect the individual's health such as abnormal conditions and illnesses; this section analysis aids prevalence in the UK and the US using year 2000 estimates. In 2000 it was estimated that 885 thousand individuals in the UK were living with Aids, and over 126 thousands individuals living with aids in the US, the total population in the UK was estimated at 58,886 thousands and 281421.906 thousand in the US. Therefore using the formula it is evident that aids prevalence rate of Aids in the UK was 150 per 10,000 individuals while the value was 447.8 per 10,000 in the US, this shows that there are relatively higher prevalence rate in the US than the UK. Disability is also an important health statistic, data show that 5.9% of the total population in the UK was disabled while 6.1% of the total population in the US was disabled in the year 2000, this means that we have more cases of disability in the US than in the UK according to the 2000 estimates. Fertility is also an important measure that indicates the trend in population, fertility can be indicated by the crude birth rate which is determined by dividing total births by the tot

Friday, January 31, 2020

Enviromental problems in Haiti Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2750 words

Enviromental problems in Haiti - Essay Example e, flooding in Mapou and Fond-Verettes caused the death of over 2,000 Haitians in May 2004 and only 4 months later, in September 2004, 3,000 people died after Tropical Storm Jeanne / Forum on the Environmental Crisis in Haiti, 2004 /. Haiti is an island, which constitutes 1/3 of Hispaniola, and occupies 1,770 km of coastline. Due to the climate and geographical situation the island had extremely rich flora and fauna, but in the last century great climate changes occurred, which caused the change of the whole general view of the island. One of the greatest problems of Haiti is deforestation of major territory of the island. Over 98% of all forests covering the island were destroyed, which entailed serious consequences like massive land erosion and sedimentation, which in its turn had the gravest possible effect on marine resources / Haiti and San Andrà ©s Join COSALC, 2006 /. Now when we look at the natural picture of the Haiti island we would see a grave picture: of previously rich forests only 1.5 % survived, 15,000 hectares of arable land become unsuitable every year, almost all water sources are seriously contaminated, rich biodiversity of Haiti was greatly influenced and destroyed /Paryski, 1996 /. The worse is that that the biological problems of Haiti go beyond the problems of the single island but threatens the environment of neighboring islands. For example, the same environmental problems are now also experienced in the Dominican Republic. The whole Hispaniola felt that the population of wintering and breeding birds reduced sharply and coral reefs disappear sharply /Paryski, 1996 /. Now let us dwell in more detail on the problems of the environment of Haiti. It should be also remembered that these problems are for the most part common with the other small island developing states. The first problem concerns land resources, which decrease considerably due to the bad-considered land use policy, great number and density of the population and the influence

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Canadian Sport And Class Inequality :: essays research papers

Canadian sport is divided amongst its classes. Not all people engage in the same sports or do the same things to stay physically active. In following pages, I have critically examined explanations on how to tell there are differences within classes, and what these differences mean to sport and physical activity in Canada.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  After examining some reasons why there is division within classes in Canadian sport, I will discuss what steps or measures would be necessary to take in order to achieve equality among the classes. I will suggest some things we can do to mesh all classes together in a unified plan. I will show how Canadian sport would be different if we lived in a ‘utopia’ of equality among classes – essentially having no classes. Class equality may not be what is best for sport in Canada. I will also weigh whether or not it would be best for Canada to be without classes in its sporting system.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  I will conclude with my recommendations on what steps must be taken for the future of Canadian sport to ensure the most efficient and equal program is in place for everyone. Class is very closely related to money and income. The more money you have or the more money your household brings in, the higher status you have. Power is also related to class and may not always belong to the coaches. In formally organized sports it may be who has the knowledge or resources desired to play the game that has the most significant amount of power. â€Å"Formally organized sports could not be developed, scheduled or maintained without material resources.†4 This certainly implies that some people hold a significant amount of power over others and remain in a class above others in sports. It should also be noted that formally organized sports are not democratic. The idea of class division is fully entertained when defining, â€Å"Rich and powerful people tend to be defined as worthy winners, while the poor and powerless tend to be defined as lazy losers.† To say there is a division of classes within sport without clearly defining each specific class, we must take a class logic mindset. Class logic can be interpreted as â€Å"economic success (winning) becomes proof of individual ability, worth, and character.† I must also mention the class logic comes to emphasize achievement through individual competition and domination over others.3 As we enter a new millennium, it is easy to draw conclusions on some things that have happened in the last.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Bidding For Hertz: Leveraged Buyout Essay

TO ACCESS THIS DOCUMENT This is a protected document. The first two pages are available for everyone to see, but only faculty members who have verified faculty status with Darden Business Publishing are able to view this entire inspection copy. Username: Submit VERIFIED FACULTY If you have verified faculty status with Darden Business Publishing, simply enter the same username that you use on the Darden Business Publishing Web site, and then click â€Å"Submit.† Please note that this is an inspection copy and is not for classroom use. Faculty Register UNVERIFIED FACULTY If you are teaching faculty and do not yet have verified faculty access with Darden Business Publishing, please click on the â€Å"Faculty Register† link and submit your information requesting verified faculty access. Buy Case Now OTHER USERS If you would like to read the full document, click on â€Å"Buy Case Now† to be redirected to the Darden Business Publishing Web site where you can purchase this and other Darden cases. If you have any questions or need technical help, please contact Darden Business Publishing at 1-800-246-3367 or email sales@dardenbusinesspublishing.com Document Id 0000-1402-9024-00009159 The protectedpdf technology is  © Copyright 2006 Vitrium Systems Inc. All Rights Reserved. Patents Pending. UVA-F-1560 Rev. April 17, 2009 BIDDING FOR HERTZ: LEVERAGED BUYOUT Overview In late summer 2005, Greg Ledford, managing director and head of automotive and transportation buyouts at the Carlyle Group, found himself examining his BlackBerry atop the Great Wall of China. Though he had planned to be sightseeing with his daughter, his immediate focus was to finalize the terms of the second-largest leveraged buyout in history. The target in question was Hertz, a subsidiary of the Ford Motor Company, which was up for sale. Ledford needed to decide the price he and his co-investors would offer for Hertz as well as assess the potential returns and risks of the deal. Already months of work, many dollars of due diligence, and arrangement of tentative financing had gone into the bid. Complicating matters, he knew he faced tough competition from a rival buyout group, no doubt engaged in a similar process. The race to win Hertz had been set in motion several months earlier, when William Clay Ford Jr., the chairman and CEO of Ford, announced plans to explore â€Å"strategic alternatives† for Hertz in April 2005. That announcement was followed in June 2005 by the filing of an S-1 registration statement setting up a â€Å"dual track process† that would result in a Hertz IPO should other sale prospects fail. Ledford, who spoke to senior Ford managers on a regular basis, had gleaned that there was interest on Ford’s part for an outright sale of Hertz. He believed a private sale that was competitive with an IPO would be viewed favorably by Ford due to its greater upfront cash proceeds and certainty of execution. When no strategic buyer surfaced, Carlyle, Clayton, Dubilier & Rice (CD&R), and Merrill Lynch Global Private  Equity (collectively â€Å"Bidding Group†) joined forces to bid on Hertz. It faced competition from another buyout consortium that included Texa s Pacific Group, Blackstone, Thomas H. Lee Partners LP, and Bain Capital LLC. This case was prepared by Susan Chaplinsky, Professor of Business Administration, Darden Graduate School of Business, and Felicia Marston, Professor, McIntire School of Commerce. It was written as a basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate effective or ineffective handling of an administrative situation. Copyright  © 2008 by the University of Virginia Darden School Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All rights reserved. To order copies, send an e-mail to sales@dardenbusinesspublishing.com. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, used in a spreadsheet, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of the Darden School Foundation. Rev. 4/09. UVA-F-1560 Hertz Ownership History Hertz’s ownership history was characterized by a series of sales, public offerings, and leveraged buyouts (Exhibit 1).1 The company was first established in 1918 by 22-year-old Walter L. Jacobs as a car rental operation with a modest inventory of 12 Model T Fords that Jacobs personally had repaired and repainted. The venture was immediately successful, leading Jacobs to expand and generate annual revenues of approximately of $1 million within five years. At the $1 million mark, in 1923, Jacobs sold his company to John Hertz, president of Yellow Cab and Yellow Truck and Coach Manufacturing Company, who gave his name to the company, creating â€Å"Hertz Drive-Ur-Self System† and a brand name that had endured ever since. John Hertz sold his investment three years later to General Motors (GM). In 1953, GM in turn sold the Hertz properties to the Omnibus Corporation, which simplified the company’s name to â€Å"The Hertz Corporation† in connection with a public stock offering on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). In late 1987,  together with Hertz management, Ford Motor Company participated in a management buyout of the company. Hertz later became an independent, wholly owned subsidiary of Ford in 1994. Less than three years later, Ford issued a minority stake of shares through a public offering on the NYSE on April 25, 1997. In early 2001, Ford reacquired the outstanding shares of Hertz and the company again became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Ford Motor Company. Hertz Financial History and Business Segments The large investor interest in Hertz over time was due in part to the company’s proven financial ability. In fact, the company had produced a pretax profit each year since 1967. During the period 1985 to 2005, revenues had grown at a compound annual growth rate of 7.6% with positive year-over-year growth in 18 of those 20 years. Over the past same period, Hertz had emerged as a truly global enterprise; it had car rental operations in 145 countries, and more than 30% of its total revenues were from outside of the United States. Hertz was among the most globally recognized brands and had been listed in BusinessWeek’s â€Å"100 Most Valuable Global Brands† (limited to public companies) in 2005 and every year since it was eligible for inclusion. Hertz currently operated in two business segments: car rental (â€Å"Hertz Rent A Car† or â€Å"RAC†) and equipment rental (â€Å"Hertz Equipment Rental Company† or â€Å"HERC†). In 2005, it was estimated that RAC would comprise 81% of company revenues and HERC 19%. RAC was supported by a network of franchises that together with company-owned facilities operated in more than 7,600 airport and local locations throughout the world. The company led its competition in the airport car rental market in Europe with operations at 69 major airports. Hertz owned and leased cars from more than 30 manufacturers, most of which it had long-term leasing.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Management Accounting Financial And Non Financial...

INTRODUCTION:- Management Accounting refers to the preparation of financial and non-financial information for the use of management of the company. It is also termed as managerial accounting. The information provided by it is helpful in making policies and strategies, budgeting,, forecasting future plans, making comparisons and evaluating performance of the management. The reports produced by management accounting are used by the internal management (managers and employees) of the organization and so they are not reported at the end of the financial year. Although bookkeeping can be traced back to the thirteenth century, accounting historians place the origin of management accounting around 1812.Around this time, material plants started to perform numerous procedures inside the association that had beforehand been performed outside the organization by free skilled workers. This disguise of procedures, for example, turning, weaving and get together made a requirement for deciding the expense of performing these exercises inside the organization. From this humble starting, Management bookkeeping has developed into an element and critical, albeit questionable piece of business and financial aspects. Thus, this control gives numerous awesome chances to understudies who look for vocations in bookkeeping and different territories of administration. Managerial accounting procedures are intended primarily to supply knowledge to decision makers within an organization. FinancialShow MoreRelatedFinancial and Managerial Accounting628 Words   |  3 PagesBoth financial and managerial accounting analyze economic data, however the major differences between the two strands include; user groups, information type, regulatory control and reporting frequency (Atrill and McLaney, 2012) User Groups: Financial accounting mostly provides information for external stakeholders such as shareholders, lending institutions, prospective investors and creditors, whereas managerial accounting mostly make available information for internal users such as managers andRead MoreManagement Practices Traditional vs Modern Innovative997 Words   |  4 PagesManagement Practices Traditional vs Modern Innovative In last many years, few management accounting innovations has been developed. Managers have to make decision on a daily basis as well make decisions regarding the future and how to survive and grow in an energetic market place with ever growing uncertain circumstances. Traditional or modern management accounting system give relevant information to all levels of management, financial and other information to make decisions about planning, controlRead MoreIntroduction to Management Accounting Terms and Examples1202 Words   |  5 PagesIntroduction to Management Accounting Terms and examples Accounting is the process of analyzing and recording transactions for the purpose of preparing reports for statutory reporting, decision making and control.    Types of accounting Bookkeeping is the recording of financial transactions. Transactions include sales, purchases, income, receipts and payments by an individual or organization. Bookkeeping is usually performed by a bookkeeper. Bookkeeping should not be confused with accounting. The accountingRead MoreCorporate Trends And Accounting Scandals946 Words   |  4 Pages‘The so called ‘new’ management accountant of recent times is quite possibly just a fantasy of new image seekers’ (Baldvinsdottir et al. 2010). Baldvinsdottir et al. (2010) argues that the concept of ‘new’ management accountants is just modern day attempt to cast of the old stereotypes of management accountants being ‘dull’ and ‘boring’ and trying to market them as something new and exciting. However, Burns Baldvinsdottir (2007) suggest that the roles of a management accountant have indeed changedRead MoreInternational Financial Reporting System ( Ifrs ) Rules And Practices927 Words   |  4 PagesInternational Financial Reporting System (IFRS) rules and practices, to the Czech Republic. The IFRS is a financial reporting system was established in an attempt to maintain stability throughout the financial community. Despite the conflicts with other countries’ accounting systems, the IFRS attempts to organize one financial standard system for businesses to report their financial statements. This article examines the relationship between domestic and global standards of accounting. The conceptRead MoreThe Role Of Accounting And Finance Methods1710 Words   |  7 PagesAccounting and finance methods have been the regular way utilise by organisations to evaluate and assess the performance of the business. Accounting and finance play a vital part in establishing and examining certain and quantifiable strategic objectives, enabling the business to function proficiently and effectually. The role of financial and non-financial data for strategic decision-making is highlighted in several explanations of accounting. I’ve recognised that accounting can be seen as theRead MoreCase Study11661 Words   |  7 Pages[pic] Question 1: What information will Fuller need to manage the business? Classify thus information in two categories: accounting information and non-accounting information. The content of financial reports can be divided to accounting and non accounting information. According to Ahmed Belkaoui and Alain Cousineau (1977), accounting information is defined as quantitative, formal, structured, audited, numerical and past oriented material. While non accounting information is defined as qualitativeRead MoreSmes, Family Involvement, And Financial Management1580 Words   |  7 PagesSMEs, Family involvement, and Financial Management In the Philippines, MSMEs can be considered as the backbone of the economy as they are major contributors of job creation and play a vital role as providers of goods and services to large firms. In fact, 99.6% out of 941,174 establishments in 2013 are micro, small, and medium enterprises. However, the attrition rates for startup MSMEs in the country can go as high as 50 percent, which means that many MSMEs are having a difficult time keeping theirRead MoreEarning Management1159 Words   |  5 PagesEarning management is good or not? Introdcution This essay is to examine whether earning management is it good or bad. Though there is so many debate about whether it should be accepted to be good rather than bad, however, this essay will explain the both side of earnings management. Earnings management reduces the quality of financial reporting, it can interfere with the resource allocation in the economy and can bring adverse consequences to the financial market. This essay analyses both, causesRead MoreManagerial Accounting vs Financial Accounting Essay761 Words   |  4 PagesManagerial and Financial Accounting ACCT/300: Principles of Accounting April 9, 2008 Managerial and Financial Accounting This paper will attempt to differentiate between managerial and financial accounting, the users of managerial and financial accounting and what type of business decisions would be made with the information. Managerial Accounting Managerial accounting provides accounting information to managers who are inside an organization and who directs and controls its operations